Marine First Aid Training

Marine First Aid Training

Transport Canada Training Standards for Marine First Aid and Marine Medical Care TP 13008 E

Being on the west coast you naturally think of the sea. And men and women certainly do go down to the sea in ships and its important to be safe out there and one of those aspects of safety is having marine first aid training in the event that something does happen.

Often these ships are out of site of land for extended periods of time and as such it pays to have a qualified first aid Attendant on board.

Transport Canada does publish very specific regulations around what level of marine first aid training is required for what size of crew and ship and how far offshore the boat/ship goes. The Transport Canada regulation is TP 13008 E and it covers Marine Basic First Aid, marine Advanced First aid and Marine Medical Care.

HeartSafe EMS has several instructors, both former Paramedics, who teach the Canadian Red Cross Marine Basic (MBFA) and Marine Advanced (MAFA) first aid courses and have done so for years up and down the coast of BC and into the Yukon and northern Alberta.

Marine Basic First Aid (MBFA)
is required by:

1. Any person who wants to obtain a rating certificate or endorsement or who wants to obtain a Master or Chief Mate certificate;

2. The person designated to provide first aid on board a vessel engaged on or near a coastal voyage, class 2 or sheltered waters voyage.

Marine Advanced First Aid (MAFA)
is required by:

1. Any person who wants to obtain a Master’s or Chief Mate certificate or endorsement;

2. The person designated to provide first aid on board a vessel engaged on a near coastal voyage, class 1 or unlimited voyage.

Marine Medical Care

Marine Medical Care is required by:

The person designated to take charge of medical care on board a vessel carrying less than 100 crew members and is engaged on a voyage of a duration of more than three days that is an unlimited voyage or a near coastal voyage, class 1.

Having worked for many years in the back of an Ambulance while its moving and often with other Paramedics I can only wonder in amazement how some one can do the same type of job in a not only moving but tossing and turning (corkscrewing?) and possibly hot environment.

Often the ship may be many hours/days away from a higher level of care when that Attendant is the patient’s best chance of pulling through and surviving their injuries or serious medical condition.

Often even the Canadian Coast Guard is hours away, not always immediately available but also may be subject to extreme weather conditions etc.

Come take your marine first aid training with the experienced Paramedics of HeartSafe EMS!

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